What is Blood Pressure?

Exercise, Health, Lifestyle

Blood pressure main

What is blood pressure (BP)?

Blood pressure is the pressure exerted by the circulating blood on the walls of the blood vessels.

What system is it part of and why?

BP is a part of the blood circulatory system, which is also known as the cardiovascular system(Refer Fig 1)

  • The heart
  • The blood vessels – arteries and veins
CirculatorySystem

Fig 1: The Circulatory System

The heart acts as a pump that is responsible for,

  • pumping oxygenated blood carried by the arteries to our organs
  • pumping deoxygenated blood that it receives through the veins from our organs. 

One of the functions of the circulatory system is to regulate the blood pressure for maintaining good blood flow throughout the body. This is required in order to transport nutrients and oxygen for every body part, for regulating body temperature, pH balance and for normal functioning of the body.

For example, when the heart pumps out oxygenated blood through the arteries, the blood flow exerts a force on the walls of the arteries. This force is measured as arterial blood pressure as shown in Fig 2. Any problems with this arterial BP may lead to a problem with the normal functioning of the body.

blood pressure

Fig 2: Arterial Blood pressure 

How is Arterial BP measured? 

The instrument that can measure the blood pressure is called Sphygmomanometer (Refer Fig 

Sphygmomanometer

Fig 3: Sphygmomanometer

It consists of:

  • a cuff,
  • a pump, and
  • a calibrated mercury scale

Typically two numbers that are being recorded on the scale which is written as a ratio. For example, BP of 120/70 mmHg, where 120 is the top number and 70 is the bottom number.

BP Measurement

Fig 3: Measuring BP

As shown in Fig 3, the BP is measured in four steps,

Step 1: Locate the pulse on an artery of the arm

Step 2: The health professional wraps the cuff around your arm and inflates it to squeeze your arm. This is done to temporarily press on the artery and close the blood flow in your arm. 

Step 3:  After the cuff is inflated, the health professional will slowly let air out. While doing this, he or she will listen to your pulse with a stethoscope and watch the mercury level on the calibrated scale to accurately note the measurements. The first pulse sound is heard and simultaneously measured on the scale.

Step 4: As the successive pulse sounds continue the professional hears it until the last pulse sound is heard which is again measured. 

The scale used is in “millimeters of mercury” (mmHg) to measure the pressure in your blood artery.

Blood pressure numbers- what does it indicate? 

systole and diastole

Fig 4: Systole and Diastole of the heart

The top number- Systolic pressure

The top number, which is also the higher of the two numbers, is the measure of the pressure in the arteries when the heart beats or contracts to pump the oxygenated blood. This is also known as the systole of the heart as shown in fig 4. 

The bottom number- Diastolic pressure

The bottom number is also the lower of the two numbers. It indicates the pressure in the arteries when the heart muscles are relaxing between two heart beats and refilling with blood. This is also known as the diastole of the heart as shown in fig 4.

BP Categories

Fig : BP Categories

Fig 5: BP Categories

Typically more attention is given to the top number (the systolic blood pressure), however, both the systolic and the diastolic pressures are important for indicating if a person is at risk of any heart disease.

What are the risk factors that will lead to high or low BP?

Risk factors

High BP

Low BP

  • Family history of High BP
  • Advanced age
  • Men get High BP more than women
  • Sedentary lifestyle
  • Poor diet, excessive salt intake
  • Drinking too much alcohol
  • Obesity
  • Smoking
  • Stress
  • Sleep apnea- a sleep disorder in which tissues in the throat collapse and block the airway.
  • Prolonged bed rest
  • Pregnancy
  • Trauma- loss of blood from major trauma, dehydration or severe internal bleeding
  • Certain medications
  • Abnormally low heart rate 
  • Endocrine problems- thyroid problems, Diabetes
  • Severe infection
  • Severe allergic reaction
  • Anemia
  • Nutritional deficiency- low blood volume due to Vit B12 and folic acid deficiency
  • Extreme heat- hot sauna and hot bath

When to seek Medical help?

There’s a common misconception that people will experience symptoms such as nervousness, sweating, difficulty sleeping or facial flushing. But the truth is that changes in blood pressure can be a symptomless condition. If you ignore your blood pressure because you think symptoms will alert you to the problem, you are actually taking a risk. It is important to know your blood pressure numbers as everyone should prevent blood pressure problems.

However, there are few signs and symptoms that may possibly occur with low and high BP. 

Signs and symptoms 
High BP Low BP
  • Severe headaches
  • Severe anxiety
  • Shortness of breath
  • Nosebleeds
  • Blood spots in the eyes
  • Facial flushing

 

  • Dizziness or lightheadedness
  • Fainting
  • Dehydration and unusual thirst
  • Lack of concentration
  • Blurred vision
  • Nausea
  • Cold, clammy, pale skin
  • Rapid, shallow breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Depression

 

How to manage BP problems?

Routine Check-up: Most people are unaware of their BP problems and going for a check-up will detect any blood pressure problems. This will prevent any potential health conditions. 

Understand your normal level of BP: There is no healthy level of high blood pressure or low blood pressure.  Your healthcare professional will determine your treatment goals based on your overall lifestyle and your body.

Lifestyle modifications

  • A nutritional diet, which may include reducing salt depending on High or low BP, Vitamin and mineral rich diet.  
  • Physical activity – exercise
  • Maintaining a healthy weight
  • Stress management
  • Smoking cessation support
  • Alcohol limitations
  • Prescribed medication in specific cases

Take precautions while exposed to heat 

When your body gets heated up during hot weather or during a hot tub or sauna bath, your blood pressure could drop and your heart rate may increase to counteract a drop in blood pressure. Normally, these events don’t cause problems. However, if you have an existing low BP you may be at risk of fainting, falls and heart problems.

Some of the precautions can be,

  • Limit your exposure to heat. Most experts say no more than five to 10 minutes is safe.
  • Stay hydrated.
  • Regulate water temperature during hot tub or sauna baths.

Conclusion

Managing blood pressure requires an individual’s adherence to the lifestyle changes and habits. It is advisable to get early assessment and treatment of your blood pressure problems in order to have a healthy circulatory system and to prevent the risk of many health conditions.    

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Ankle Injuries – Sprain, Strains and Fractures

Common conditions, Exercise, Injury, Lifestyle, Pain

Ankle sprain main

An ankle injury is the most common type of injury that may involve the bones of the ankle and other soft tissue structures. Three are three types of injuries that are observed at the ankle:

  • Sprains
  • Strains
  • Fractures

Sprains are injuries to the ligaments that connect one bone to another. An ankle sprain may involve an injury to one or more ligaments that stabilize the ankle and the foot. 

Strains are injuries that involve musculotendinous (muscle and tendon) structures. Both sprains and strains can occur due to over-stretching or tearing of the ligaments and tendons due to sudden twisting of the ankle joint or when excessive forces are applied on them.

Fractures are injuries that involve bones of the ankle joint. It ranges from a simple break in one bone to several fractures, which causes your ankle to move out of place and puts you in great pain.

Who could be at a risk of an ankle injury?

Ankle injuries may occur among,

  • Dancers
  • Sports persons- Gymnasts, basketball players, players participating in jumping sports etc.
  • Women wearing unstable high heels
  • Hypermobile people who already have laxed ankle ligaments 

Types of Ankle injuries

  • Lateral ankle injury

This is the most common injury to the ankle. Often, an inversion sprain could be an associated with a fracture and a strain to the peroneal tendons.  

An inversion sprain happens when the ankle in twisted inwards with an inward rolled foot as shown in Fig 1.

inversion injury

Fig 1: Lateral ankle injury

  • The Medial ankle injury

This type of injury occurs at the inner aspect of the ankle. Like a inversion sprain, the eversion sprain may also be associated with fractures of lower ends of the leg bones and strains to the tibialis anterior muscle.  

Eversion sprain happens when the ankle is twisted out with the foot rolled outwards as shown in Fig 2.

eversion injury

Fig 2: Medial ankle injury

High Ankle Injury

This type of injury is very rare. A high ankle sprain happens when the tibia bone rotates injuring the ligaments that hold the lower end of the two leg bones (tibia and fibula) as shown in Fig 3.

Severe injuries may cause fracture to the lower ends of the leg bones.

syndesmosis injury

Fig 3: High ankle injury

Severity of an ankle sprain 

An ankle ligament sprain can be graded according to the severity of the tear in the ligaments as shown in Fig 4.
 
lateral ankle sprain

Fig 4: Grades of ankle sprain

Sign and Symptoms of Ankle Injury
 
    • Swelling: Increased fluid in the tissue due to inflammation and soft tissue damage.
    • Pain:  Depending upon the severity of the injury and the structures involved, pain intensity can vary. 
    • Redness/ Warmth/ Tenderness: Caused by increased blood flow to the area.
    • Unstable ankle: The affected side feels weak and difficult to weight-bear.
    • Deformity: Severe injuries can cause fractured bones to move out of place and make the ankle look deformed.
Causes of Ankle Injury
Trauma
  • Stepping in a hole or a stone
  • Running on uneven ground
  • Fall or slippage on wet floor
  • Contact injury during sports like basketball, when a player is accidentally hit by an opponent causing the foot to roll inwards as shown in Fig 5.
Basketball

Fig 5: Lateral ankle sprain during basketball

Muscle imbalances

Lack of flexibility in muscles can hamper joint movement. For example, if the calf muscles are very tight, it will affect the stability and mobility of the ankle joint. In such a state, if one engages in any physical activity like running there could be a potential risk of twisting an ankle. Sometimes even lack of warm-up and stretching could be the cause of muscle imbalances.

  • Lack of Postural control

Postural control is defined as the act of maintaining, achieving or restoring a state of balance during any posture or activity.

It helps to maintain a good base of support for balance so that the force of gravity can act on the center of mass (COM) of the body. Centre of mass is the point in the body where the entire body weight is concentrated (located in the lower end of the spine) as shown in Fig 6.

Figure_10_03_05

Fig 6: Line of gravity and base of support

During sports, sudden quick body movements or external forces like a push or a contact by an opponent will affect your balance. If you lack postural controlm you may lose balance and risk hurting your ankle. 

Diagnosis of an ankle injury

Most ankle injuries are usually straightforward ligament strains. However, the clinical presentation of subtle fractures can be similar to that of a ankle sprains and these fractures can be easily missed on initial examination. Fractures are usually detected via X-ray scans. If any fracture is left untreated, it may cause excessive pain and disability to an extent that you may not be able to bear weight on the joint. Therefore, an X-ray or an MRI scan is often recommended to understand the severity of the injury.

For example, a lateral ankle sprain showing fractured bones in an X-ray is shown in fig 7. 

ankle sprain with bone fracture

Fig 7: Lateral ankle sprain with fracture of the lower end of fibula bone

Ankle Injury management

Usually, ligament injuries heal in about 6-12 weeks and fractured bones take about 3-6 months to heal. This is however largely dependent on the severity of the injury and lifestyle of the individual so complete healing time frame may vary. 

Even after the healing process, ankle injuries may cause long term instability if not healed correctly. This may also be the cause of recurrent ankle sprains. An expert assessment of ankle mechanics is very important to decide on how long to protect and rehabilitate an ankle after an injury. The treatment plan will aim to restore the normal functions of the ankle and make return-to-play decisions based on the stability of the ankle thus preventing recurrent ankle injuries.

Ankle 101

anatomy, Ankle, Foot

ankle joint only

The ankle plays an important role in the pattern of lower limb movements both in weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing positions.

Ankle movements: (Refer Fig 1)

  • Plantarflexion (down)
  • Dorsiflexion(up)
  • Inversion (inwards)
  • Eversion (outwards)
dorsi and plantar flexion

Fig 1: Dorsiflexion, Plantarflexion, Eversion and Inversion

Plantar flexion is the movement that describes the pointing of the toes toward the ground, as in standing on one’s toes.

Dorsiflexion is the opposite of plantarflexion and involves pulling the toes up as in walking on one’s heels.

Inversion is inward rolling of the foot towards the body’s midline and eversion is the exact opposite which involves outward rolling of the foot away from the midline of the body.

Joints in relation to movement

The ankle is made up of three distinct joints namely, 

  • Talo-crural joint (Ankle joint)
  • Subtalar joint 
  • Distal Tibiofibular joint (High ankle)
joints of the ankle

Fig 2: 3 types of ankle joints

Talo-crural joint (Ankle joint): It a hinge type of joint that allows movements of dorsiflexion and plantar flexion along one plane.The articulation of the lower ends of the leg bones and one of the tarsal bones (talus) forms the ankle joint.  

Subtalar joint: The movements of Inversion and eversion take place at this joint. It lies beneath the ankle joint and is formed by the articulation between the talus and the calcaneal bone of the foot. 

Distal tibiofibular joint (High ankle): This is a syndesmosis joint between the lower ends of the bones of the leg(tibia and fibula).  A syndesmosis joint is a joint where the bones are connected by ligaments and have minimal movements.

Muscles that cause ankle movements

The muscles from the leg end as tendons that attach to the foot bones. They contract and transfer forces to cause a movement across the ankle joint.

  • Outer muscles of the leg: The peroneal (Peroneus long and peroneus brevis) muscles are present on the outside aspect of the leg as shown in Fig 3. The contraction of the peroneal muscles help bend the ankle down moving the foot downwards (Plantar flexion) as in fig 3.
Peroneal muscles

Fig 3: Peroneal Muscles and Plantar flexion

The peroneals also help to stabilize the big toe as it attaches behind it. It helps to lift the arch and plantar fascia to produce spring-like effect during running and jumping activities.

  • Back muscles of the leg: The calf muscles (gastrocnemius and soleus) and the tibialis posterior muscles are present at the back of the leg as shown in Fig 4.
back of the leg

Fig 4: Calf and Tibialis posterior muscle.

The calf connects to the heel bone by the Achilles’ tendon. When the calf muscles contract they moving the foot downwards (Plantar Flexion). The posterior tibialis help to turn the foot inwards (Inversion). They help to propel the body forwards as the foot pushes on the ground while walking.

  • Front muscles of the leg: The tibialis anterior present in the front of the leg  and attached in the front of the foot as shown in Fig 5.
tibialis anterior muscle

Fig 5: Tibialis anterior muscle and dorsiflexion

The Tibialis anterior muscle pulls the ankle upwards (Dorsiflexion). It plays a role in striking the heel when you take a step forwards in walking.

Ligaments that support the ankle

Apart from muscles, the ankle is stabilized by many ligaments that surround the ankle. 

  • Lateral ligaments (outer ankle ligaments)
  • Medial ligaments (inner ankle ligaments)
  • High ankle ligaments

Lateral ligaments

Lateral ligaments are present on the outer aspect of the ankle that are attached at the anterior (front), lateral (outer side) and posterior (back) parts of the ankle as shown in Fig 6. 

Outer ligaments of the ankle

Fig 6: Lateral Ligaments

  • The Lateral ligaments play an important role to prevent excessive plantar flexion and inversion movements of the foot. 
  • Along with the medial ligaments, they also provide stability to the ankle during weight bearing movements.

Medial ligaments (Inner Ankle Ligaments) 

The medial ligament otherwise known as deltoid ligament is present on the inner aspect of the ankle, as shown in Fig 7. 

Ligaments of the ankle

Fig 7: Medial ligaments (Deltiod ligament)

  • The medial ligaments function as the main stabilizer of the inner aspect of the ankle against shear and rotational forces.
  • They also act to support the inner arch of the foot.

Distal tibiofibular ligaments

The distal tibiofibular ligaments are located above the ankle and connect the high ankle syndesmosis joint as shown in Fig. 8. 

Syndesmotic ligament complex

Fig 8. High ankle ligaments

  • The high ankle ligaments ensure stability between the lower end of the tibia and the fibula.
  • They resist any force that attempt to separate the tibia and fibula.

Risk of injury to the ankle 

Any inflexibility in the ankle may cause inability to perform a movement properly. For example, poor ankle mobility due to tight soft tissue structures can reduce the range of movement at the ankle causing the knees, hips and trunk to over compensate. This may impair the ability of the trunk to load the joints properly hence increasing the risk an injury.

Common Knee Ligament Injuries

Common conditions, Injury, Lifestyle, Pain

17vike0510.jpg

A ligament is a band of connective tissue composed mainly of collagen fibres. The knee joint ligaments connect the femur (thighbone) to the tibia (leg bone) at the knee joint to improve its stability and to limit the amount of mobility in the joint.

The four main ligaments of the knee joint are,

  • ACL: Anterior Cruciate Ligament
  • PCL: Posterior Cruciate Ligament
  • MCL: Medial Collateral Ligament
  • LCL: Lateral Collateral Ligament
knee ligaments

Fig 1: Ligaments of the knee joint

Functions of the knee ligaments

  • Stability to the knee joint

The ligaments of the knee are responsible for preventing the tibia (shin bone) from sliding out of the femur (thigh bone). During rotational movements, knee ligaments work together to prevent both valgus (knee moved inwards) or varus (knee moved outwards) stresses to the knee.

According to their attachments in the knee, the ligaments prevent tibial displacements. For example, ACL prevents forward displacement of the tibia while PCL prevents backward displacement of the tibia. Similarily, the MCL provides support on the inner side of the knee while the LCL provides support on the outer side of the knee.

  • Locking the knee during walking

Apart from supporting the bones, the knee ligaments contribute to the “screw-home” mechanism, a process that locks the knees during walking. For example, just before you strike the heel to the ground your knee is slightly flexed (about 20 degrees bent) then the screw home mechanism works to straighten the knee as your body moves over the planted heel as shown in Fig 2.

swing to stance

Fig 2: Screw-home mechanism

What does a ligament Injury mean?

A ligament injury is the over-stretching or tearing of the ligaments of the knee. A tear may be partial or complete.

mcl injury BY GRADES

Fig 3 Grades of  Ligament injury

What can cause a Knee Ligament Injury?

Extreme movements at the knee joint forcing the knee to move beyond its normal motion can injure a ligament. Most of the injuries occur during weight-bearing activities, as the ligaments resist against perturbations at the knee.

Types of people who usually get them

  • Sports people like football players, basketball players, skiers etc.
  • Hyper-mobile individuals who engage in high-impact sports may have an injury due to excessive laxity in the knee ligaments.
  • Accidental fall on the knees or hit on the knees during contact sports like rugby, football etc or automobile accidents (in which the knees can hit the dashboard)

Mechanism of an injury

hyperextension

Fig 4: Causes of knee injury

  • Hyper extension injury

Extending the knee too far by over straightening of the knee. This can happen when you stop suddenly while running.

  • Flexion and Hyperflexion injury

Jumping and landing on a flexed (bent) knee or falling on your knees with over overbent knees.

  • Rotational injuries

Valgum (inner) or varum (outer) stress on the knees due to twisting of your knee inwards and outwards. Sudden shifting of weight from one leg to the other.

  • Contact Sports

Accidental hit on the knee during sports as shown in Fig 5

PCL INJURY

Fig 5: Direct hit on the leg

Other Reasons that contribute to a Ligament Injury

  • Lack of force distribution

During movement, the body exerts a force on the ground and at the same time, an equal and opposite ground reaction force (GRF) is exerted by the ground on the body. This GRF is directed towards the center of mass (COM) of the body, a point in the body where the entire body weight is concentrated; in front of the tailbone.

If there is an imbalance, which means the athlete’s knee does not bend on landing and remains straight, the GRF creates a forward shear force that pushes the tibial forwards, stressing the ligaments. Hamstring muscles on the back of the thigh play a vital role in stabilizing the knee joint especially when the athlete lands. Normally, the knees normally bend slightly to absorb GRF as shown in Fig 6.

QUADS DOMINANCE

Fig 6: Hamstring action advantage for absorbing GRF

  • Lack of trunk control

Without trunk control, there will be greater movements in the trunk following a perturbation (disturbance) which could affect the distribution of the GRF.

Lack of control in the trunk motion happens because of diminished proprioception. In such a situation, if the trunk moves more on the side of the knee joint laterally, the GRF tracks the COG and follows the movement of the trunk. As the GRF tracks the COM, and if it progresses beyond the center of the knee joint, it results in a movement of the knee joint into a valgus alignment stressing the knee ligaments as shown in Fig 6.

Trunk dominance

Fig 6: Valgus alignment of the left knee

Signs and Symptoms of Ligament Injury

  • Popping sound at the time of injury can indicate a ligament rupture.
  • The knee swelling within the first 24 to 48 hours
  • Tenderness and possibly redness around your knee on touching. 
  • Knee feels unstable or may buckle during weight bearing. This may cause you to limp or feel wobbly at the knee during walking.
  • Bruising around the knee can develop. 

What to do if you think you have an injury?

If you are having any of the above signs or symptoms, seek immediate medical attention. What can appear to be a simple ligament or soft tissue strain may become something more if left untreated. Diagnostic tests such as an X-ray or MRI scan will be able to show any tears or rupture of the ligaments. According to the severity of the ligament injury, appropriate treatment care will be advised.

Anatomy of the Hip

anatomy, Hip, Lifestyle

hip joint

The anatomy of the hip includes the ball-and-socket joint that involve two separate bones namely, the thigh bone and the pelvis.The unique anatomy of the hip enables it to be extremely strong and agile controlling every position of the lower limb in both weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing movements.

Bones of the Hip 

The Bones of the Hip include,

  • Pelvic bones (Ilium, Ischium, Pubis)
  • Femur (Thigh bone)

Fig 1: Shows the two Hip bones, sacrum, the acetabular socket of the hip joint, the entire Hip.

Pelvis

As shown in Fig.1, the pelvis is made up of two halves or two hip bones. Each hip bone is formed from the fusion of three bones: ilium, ischium and pubis. Fusion of these three bones, form one solid pelvic bone. The Pelvic bone contributes to the hip socket or acetabulum. Each pubic bone connect in front at the symphysis pubis.

Between the two hip bones, lies the foundation for the pelvis, the sacrum. The sacrum is a triangular-shaped bone that comprise of five fused bones at the lower end of the spine.

Fig 2. The Femur (thigh bone)

Femur

As shown in fig 2, the femur is more commonly known as the thigh bone which consists of the round head, the neck, the shaft and two condyles (lateral and medial) at the base of the femur.

The HIP joint

Like the shoulder, the hip joint is also a ball-and-socket joint, where the ball is the head of the femur, and the socket is the acetabulum.

Fig 3: Ball and socket hip joint

HIP JOINT 1

Articular Cartilage and labrum

The articular cartilage is a protective material that covers the articular surfaces of the hip joint (refer Fig.4).  It is about one-quarter of an inch in thickness with a rubbery consistency.The function of the cartilage is related to its structure and thus acts as a shock absorber by allowing better transmission of forces. It also helps prevent friction between the bones and is slippery enough to allow the joint surfaces to slide against one another without causing any damage.

The Labrum is a fibrous rim of cartilage around the acetabular socket that holds the femoral head in the joint providing stability.

Fig 4: Shows articular cartilage and labrum

cartilage and labrum

Joint capsule and ligaments of the Hip joint

The joint capsule is a watertight sac that surrounds the hip joint. The capsule is reinforced by three major ligaments, which are denser bands of connective tissue.

Fig 5: Shows Capsule and reinforced ligaments of the hip joint

capsule and lig

The attachments of each of these ligaments can be identified by its name- the iliofemoral ligament extends from the ilium on the pelvis to the femur, the pubofemoral ligament connects the pubic bone to the femur, and the ischiofemoral ligament extends from the ischium to the femur.

A small ligament called ligamentum teres connects the very tip of the femoral head to the acetabular socket. It accommodates a small artery within itself that brings an important blood supply to part of the femoral head.

Muscles around the hip joint:

Back muscles of the hip 

These Muscles are responsible for hip joint extension (backward movement)

They include,

  • Gluteus maximus
  • Hamstrings (long head of biceps femoris, semitendinosus, semimembranosus)

Fig 6: Extensor muscles

gluteal and hamstring muscles

These muscles cause the hip to move backwards in extension (Fig 7), it also causes knee flexion (bending the knee by bringing the heel towards the buttock). Hip extension is important during gait especially to propel your body forwards.

Fig 7: Hip extension movement of the hip joint

hip extention

Gluteus maximus contraction is a powerful action that opposes the force of gravity. The action of gluteus maximus is to move the hip bone(thigh) backward from a position of full flexion(bent), as in climbing stairs, or rising from a squatting or sitting position.

Fig 8: Action of Gluteus Maximus muscle

Gluteus max sit to stand

Front muscles of the pelvis

These muscles are responsible for hip joint flexion (forward movement).They include,

  • Iliopsoas (iliacus and psoas)
  • Rectus femoris
  • Tensor fasciae latae
  • Sartorius

Fig 9: Hip Flexor muscles

fllexor muscles

The hip flexors help you to draw your leg towards your chest and also helps to you move your legs from side to side and backwards. It serves to stabilize your hips, keeping the joints of your pelvis and lower back strong.

Fig 10: Hip flexion movement

hip flexion

Hip flexion movement is also important during the gait cycle in order to bring you leg forwards for heel strike.

Inner thigh muscles

These muscles are responsible for hip joint adduction (inward movement).They include,

  • Pectineus
  • Adductor brevis
  • Adductor longus
  • Gracilis
  • Adductor magnus.

Fig11: Aductor muscles of the hip joint

hip adductors

When the foot is not planted on the ground, the adductors will bring the leg toward the midline of the body. Also known as an open kinetic chain movement (open kinetic chain is defined as a combination of successively arranged joints in which the terminal body segment can move freely).

Fig 12: Adduction movement

adductors

Apart from the adduction movement in open kinetic chain, adductors also contributes during closed kinetic chain movements (In a closed kinetic chain movement, the distal end of the extremity is fixed, emphasizing joint compression and, in turn, stabilizing the joints).

A simple example would be during bilateral stance (standing on both legs) movement like squatting, adductors of both the hip joints help contribute to the stability in the pelvis. These adductors work with abductor muscles synergistically to provide side-to-side stabilization of the pelvis.

During walking, adductors also contribute throughout the gait cycle. For example, when you foot is move forwards before striking on the ground, the adductors will bring the leg towards the midline. Similarily, adductors with help in flexing the hip when the thigh is in an extended position as in the swing phase of the gait (walking) cycle.

Fig 13: Action of adductors during gait

Gait cycle

They are not the prime movers but function in reflex response to gait activities.

The only two-joint muscle of the adductor group, the gracilis, functions as an inner knee stabilizer and helps stabilize both the hip and knee during weight-bearing.

Outer muscles of the thigh

These muscles are responsible for hip joint abduction (outward movement). They include,

  • Gluteus medius
  • Gluteus minimus
  • Tensor fascia latae

Fig 14: Abductor muscles of the hip

abductors

In open kinetic chain movement when standing on one leg, the abductors move the leg away from the midline of the body.

Fig 15: Abduction in single leg stance

hip abduction

The gluteus medius however, is more of a lower extremity dynamic stabilizer than it is a pure hip abductor.  If the gluteus medius and minimus are weak or atrophied, the pelvis will drop to the opposite side when you bear full weight on the same side during walking. This dysfunctional postural pattern is referred to as the Trendelenburg sign.

Fig 16: Pelvic stabilization (strong Gluteus medius) and pelvic drop (weak Gluteus medius)

Gluteus medius

As you can see in fig 16, weakness of the right gluteus medius will cause the left hip to drop when standing on the right leg. Thus, during walking the primary function of the gluteus medius is to stabilize the pelvis when weight is shifted from one side to the other.

External rotators of the hip joint

Muscles of the thigh responsible for hip joint external rotation (twisting hip outwards) include,

Primary External Rotators:

  • Obturatorius internus and externus
  • Gemellus superior and inferior
  • Quadratus femoris
  • Piriformis

Secondary External Rotators:

  • Gluteus Maximus (lower fibres)
  • Gluteus Medius and minimus muscles when the hip is extended
  • Psoas Major Muscle
  • Psoas Minor Muscle
  • Sartorius

In the open kinetic chain the primary and secondary external rotators turn the lower limb outwards in relation to a fixed pelvis. This action is seen with the movement of the hip with knee flexion as seen in Fig 17.

Fig 17: External rotation

hip-external-rotation

However, in the closed kinetic chain scenario, with the foot fixed on the ground, the activation of these same muscles will cause the same movement at the hip-pelvis interface will cause the pelvis/torso to rotate.  For example, refer Fig 18. a closed chain right lower limb, upon activation of the external hip rotators the person’s pelvis and trunk will rotate to the left simultaneously (counterclockwise rotation) along the vertical body axis about the fixed right limb.

Fig.18 external rotation of right hip

Standing twist

This rotation can occur from activation of not only the hip rotators but also from the muscles of the abdomen, thoracic spine and rib cage.

Role in Hip stabilization

The deep external rotators (quadratus femoris, obturator internus and externus and the gemelli) are also active stabilisers of the hip and, along with the internally rotator gluteus minimis, they are also described as the “rotator cuff muscles” of the hip. The quadratus femoris,

During weight bearing, the deep rotators having a short moment arm and smaller in area there is minimal capacity of rotational force and more of  a horizontal line of force, which is more important in the compression of the joint surfaces.Thus creating more stability in the hip joint during movements.

Hip Internal Rotators

The muscles that are responsible for twisting the leg inwards (Internal Rotators) are,

  •  Anterior portion of the gluteus medius
  • Tensor fasciae latae

The head of thigh bone (femur) rotates inwards within the hip joint. It also occurs in standing when the lower limb is fixed and the trunk/pelvis rotates as already seen in hip external rotation. Internal rotation is the exact opposite.

In the open kinetic chain, the internal rotators turn the lower limb inwards in relation to a fixed pelvis. This action is seen with the movement of the hip with knee flexion as seen in Fig 19.

Fig 19: Open chain internal rotation of hip joint

Hip Internal roation

Similarily, Fig 20 shows a closed chain right lower limb, upon activation of the internal hip rotators driven by the person’s pelvis and rotation to the Right side simultaneously (clockwise rotation) along the vertical body axis about the fixed right limb.

Fig 20: Right hip internal rotation and right side pelvic rotaion

Twist IR

Role of internal rotators

During walking, in order to sufficiently extend the hip toward the end of the gait cycle, there has to be enough hip internal rotation (Fig 21). Without sufficient internal rotation, the pelvis will move as far forward over the stance leg, and we instinctively shorten our stride.

Fig 21: Hip extension and internal rotation of left hip joint in the final phase of the gait cycle.

gait IR

In conclusion, a thorough understanding of pelvic and hip anatomy is important for undermining any cause of dysfunction or injury. Even a lack of range of motion due to tightness in the soft tissue structures can put you at risk of involving compensatory movements that can lead to postural problems. Always seek medical advice when in doubt.

Rotator Cuff Injury

Common conditions, Injury, Pain

shoulder

Our shoulders are the most movable joints in our body. Most activities whether simple or strenuous engage both our shoulders. That is the reason why with a little bit of pain in our shoulders, we find it very difficult to do even the simplest of tasks like putting on a coat or carrying groceries. Sometimes there is a crunchy sensation or you may hear clicking and popping sounds while you move your shoulder or do weights. This pain can worsen making you feel frustrated, leaving your shoulders feeling weaker than normal and stiff to move. There could be many reasons for the cause of your shoulder pain but the most common injury that could possibly show these type of symptoms would be a rotator cuff injury.

What is the rotator cuff and how does it get injured?

Rotator cuff injury

The Rotator cuff is a group of muscles coming from the shoulder blade and ending in tendons that attach to the arm bone. These muscles cup the shoulder and are responsible for its stability during movement. The muscles of the rotator cuff muscles include:

  • Supraspinatus
  • Infraspinatus
  • Subscapularis
  • Teres Minor

“Centralisation”- Your rotator cuff is important

The function of the rotator cuff, in addition to generating torque, is to dynamically stabilize the shoulder joint. It keeps the ball of the shoulder centred over the small glenoid socket. Thus, stronger rotator cuff muscles result in the better glenohumeral joint stabilization and hold the humeral head into the glenoid by depressing it. This prevents impingement and decreased chances of shoulder dislocation when the deltoid abducts(arm sideways up) the shoulder. Without an intact rotator cuff, particularly during the first 60 degrees the ball of the shoulder would migrate up the glenoid cavity causing the rotator cuff attachments to get compressed by the acromion leading to impingement of the rotator cuff. In patients with large rotator cuff tears, the humeral head is poorly depressed and can migrate cephalad during active elevation of the arm.

Rotator cuff injuries

Sometimes sudden fall or high impact sports could be the cause of injury but in most cases, it is due to the repetitive injury over the tendons as they being pulled beyond their capacity to stretch. This gradually worsens causing partial or full tear of the tendons. Due to the way these tendons cup the shoulder by being closely spaced, they are more at risk of friction. Especially when you turn your shoulder or lift any weight at the end range of shoulder movement, the tendons in this tight space become taut and rub against the bony knob (acromion process of the scapula) above them or against a ligament at the front of the shoulder. This causes friction, pain and as a normal response, inflammation sets leading to pain, swelling and movement restriction.

Physiology of rotator cuff damage

1. Tendonitis (acute Inflammation)

Tendonitis can occur in a particular rotator cuff tendon causing pain, inflammation and irritation. If this condition becomes more chronic, more tendons can become involved or it may progress to a tendinosis (degeneration).

2. Impingement Syndrome (compression of the tendon)

The most common site of impingements is within the “supraspinatus outlet”. This outlet is a space formed by the acromion process of the scapula, the coracoacromial ligament and the upper rim of the humeral head. Subacromial outlet

Impingement within the outlet can be caused by:

  • Thickened Coracoacromial ligament: This can cause impingement by becoming thickened due to excess calcium deposits that will compress the supraspinatus tendon.
  • Hooked acromium: In repetitive overhead activities, the tendons rubs against the acromion process of the Scapula and gets damaged. When the inflammation spreads into the pocket of fluids (subacromial bursa) that lubricates the rotator cuff tendons under the acromion bone. This causes subacromion bursistis and the pain gets even worse on movements.
  • Abnormal Scapular Movement: With normal shoulder movement, the scapula moves outward and upwards helping the shoulder to move up

scaphumerorhythm movement

  • In the case of an unhealthy shoulder, the scapula does not move in the same fashion as the healthy shoulder and gets “stuck” in a lower position. This could lead to abnormal movement of the scapula during shoulder movement. Poor scapular movement will cause compression of the tendons in the supraspinatus outlet increasing the chances of impingement of the rotator cuff tendon that goes under it.
  • The picture below shows an unhealthy right shoulder at a risk of impingement, showing improper movement in the scapula.

chances of impingement

3. Rotator cuff tears

A tear is a result of the worsening of the tendon damage. Although an acute fall can tear the rotator cuff tendon, chronic inflammation and degeneration due to impingement is the major cause of tears. This tear can start small and get larger over time due to repetitive use or a re-injury. When a tear occurs, there will be severe weakness and atrophy(loss of muscle mass) of the muscles around the arm and loss of movements of the shoulder. impingement

How is Rotator Cuff Injury Diagnosed?

Pain in the shoulder could be caused by various other reasons like joint injury, capsule injury, nerve problems and many more. A thorough examination of the shoulder should be done to distinguish the injury type. If a tear is suspected in the rotator cuff an MRI or an arthrogram (X-ray of the shoulder joint after injecting a contrast dye) can be taken.

normal

Prevention and Management

A proper diagnosis and plan of management is necessary for the treatment and prevention of rotator cuff damage. Initial treatment would be pain relief, rest and avoiding any activity that aggravates pain in order to enhance the healing process. Further treatments will be decided upon the individual’s condition. Thorough assessment and planning by the experts with an application of knowledge of the condition and correct methods of treatment will promote recovery and prevent injury reoccurrence.